Learning to Play the Piano- A Traditional Teacher or the Modern Way?

Learning to Play the Piano- A Traditional Teacher or the Modern Way?

I think to best answer this question, you need to ask yourself what you wish to achieve?

 

If you are looking at concert pianist status, I think I can comfortably suggest a traditional teacher and music school is the way to go.

 

On the other hand, if you are just interested in playing for pleasurem, then you could go either the traditional way, or the modern, online style of course.

 

The main benefit in online courses is that you can study when it suits you, even if it is two in the morning. I don’t know of too many teachers that are happy to accept pupils at two am.

 

However, even though some online courses are very good, it is difficult without the absolute guidance of a professional. 

 

However, \the Rocket Piano course is probably the next best thing, if you can’t afford a teacher or have access to one for that matter. The courses are delivered online by download, so you can review the material in your own time, and that is very flexible.

 

Now the case with Rocket piano is that the team who have developed it are all at Grade 8 level, so they’ve been around for a while.They have knowledge in all genera’s of piano . The system comprises of three book sof information as well as electronic tutorials.

The lessons have also been created to cater for all levels of player, regardless of weather you have just begun, or are at a much more advanced level.

To Learn More about this course, please head over to Rocket Piano.

Piano and the Risk of Tendonitis

Piano and the Risk of Tendonitis

 

Piano and the Risk of Tendonitis

As someone who has lived through 3 incredibly painful bouts of tendonitis, both in my left arm and right arm, I thought it important to pass on some information that has helped me deal with this in the past.



It is important to understand that playing the piano can cause serious injuries such as tendonitis and carpel tunnel syndrome. Both these ailments are known as repetitive strain injuries. The constant up and down, side to side movement of the arms and fingers when playing piano for long periods of time is what causes these injuries.



This is common among piano players. In fact, it is so common that there is a special clinic in Hamilton, Ontario called the Musician’s Clinics of Canada that deals with the prevention and rehabilitation of musician injuries. Naturally their patients include other instrumentalists like violin and guitar but, pianist injuries are certainly among the most common.



What can be done when a pianist gets tendonitis or carpel tunnel syndrome? Well, certainly there are conventional methods of dealing with the inflammation and pain. Unfortunately these types of treatments such as; anti-inflammatories, pain medications and physio therapy are designed to treat the symptoms. Therefore, once the pianist goes back to playing the piano without being completely healed the injuries can re-occur and in the end be quite difficult to get rid of.



It is not uncommon for tendonitis to stick around for very long periods of time. In my case, I once had a problem with my right arm that took almost 3 years to get better. The problem is of course that, as a professional I can’t possibly just stop playing the piano. I can take breaks in between concerts but usually I can only take up to a month’s rest at a time. 



So, how can these injuries be cured while still continuing to play? It’s important to understand that not every case is the same but, for me, I actually had to re-learn how to play the piano the correct way. I realized, after visiting the musician’s clinic, that I had the completely wrong approach to playing piano. Specifically, I was too close to the keyboard, I had the wrong wrist position, the wrong finger position and I didn’t understand the concept of leverage.



Leverage means to use the entire body to create volume on the piano. I was trying to create volume by forcing the keys down with forearm strength instead of using the entire body. Therefore, my arm muscles and joints suffered from the strain of trying to play too loud. What I eventually realized, with the help of the musician’s clinic doctor was that, I needed to create velocity as opposed to force. Once the key reached the bottom of its natural movement it can go no further. Yet, I was trying to force the note passed its end without even realizing it.



The correct way is to drive the note down with extra velocity using the back, shoulders, biceps, arms, wrists and fingers and then release at the exact moment the key reaches its lowest point. Therefore, it’s the velocity of the hammer hitting the string that creates volume. Knowing when to let up is very important in the fight to prevent injury.



In terms of moving the piano bench back, I had to learn also to sit with better upright posture and to generate leverage using my entire body. It’s easier to do this with the right foot (pedal foot) forward and the left foot back under the bench. Then as you pivot forward and backward on the bench you have more balance and leverage.



Once last point I should mention; exercise is very important. I started weight training several years ago because, I find that the extra muscle helps a great deal in preventing injury. Be careful however, to consult a professional when starting weight training. You must do it the correct way in order for it to be beneficial.

 

Paul Tobey – About the Author:

 

Learning piano lessons takes motivation that sometimes can be missing. Paul Tobey’s online piano lessons are perfect for anyone who may be considering learning to play better piano. He a free piano lesson to new members.





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Relieving Symptoms of Tendonitis With Chiropractic Therapy

Relieving Symptoms of Tendonitis With Chiropractic Therapy

Relieving Symptoms of Tendonitis With Chiropractic Therapy

Relieving Symptoms of Tendonitis With Chiropractic Therapy
By Dr Jeremy Portmann

Whether it be tennis elbow, runner’s knee, or jumper’s knee, all these conditions point to tendonitis: a fibrous tissue inflammation that connects the muscles to the bone, causing movement restriction and resulting pain. Often, athletes (casual or not) are likelier to develop tendonitis simply because of their partaking in repetitive activities. Computer programmers and typists are also prone to wrist tendonitis due their repetitive keyboard use. Similarly, pianists may also be afflicted with the same problem.

Traditional medicine has often relied on treatments that merely address the symptoms, such as cortisone injections. However, steroids and anti-inflammatories only mask the symptoms of a problem that will return the moment the injections stop. They also bring about myriad side effects. Anti-inflammatories often results in stomach and intestinal pain. In fact, more than a third of people on anti-inflammatory drugs report gastrointestinal pain.

Causes of Tendonitis

  • In the majority of cases, tendonitis is due to strain of repetitive movements. Strain can also be due to too much stress placed on the tendons from improper or imbalanced exercise routines.
  • Aging. As the body ages, tendons harden and lose some of their elasticity. This translates into joint inflexibility.
  • Injury. Occasionally, tendonitis develop following another tendon or joint injury. In such cases, tendonitis may develop because the injury has not fully healed.
  • Other conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, can cause tendonitis as a result of unusual pressure or strain on the tendons.
  • Thermal injury. Occasionally, thermal injury can bring about tendonitis, affecting the hands, wrists, and feet. Rock climbers and hikers sometimes report thermal injuries.

Symptoms of Tendonitis

  • Pain when the tendon is under pressure. Pressure can come from weight lifting, playing tennis, or any type of manual job (such as typing).
  • Movement restriction without pain.
  • Pain, swelling, or stiffness to the affected area.
  • Restricted movement in a specified area. For example, someone with tendonitis in the bicep may not be able to move the arm fully.
  • Pain to the affected area when touched or moved. As tendonitis progresses, pain may occur irregardless of whether the tendon is under pressure or not. In such cases, pain may occur as a result of the area being merely touched.
  • A burning sensation around the affected area. Or, in more serious cases, the area becomes swollen, red, warm or “lumpy” as a result of accumulation of fluid and inflammation.

Tendonitis Treatment

  • Stop the activity that is causing the pain, resting the the affected area for at least 3 weeks. After a period of rest, the tendon will likely be able to heal itself.
  • Mobilize the area, if possible, with braces.
  • As part of rehabilitative exercises, gentle stretching and strengthening exercises will help restore tendon mobility. Contact a chiropractic doctor for precise advice on the proper type of exercises to perform. You will also receive advice of warming up techniques that can decrease the risk of muscle strain.
  • Employ massage therapy. Massage therapy helps ease the pain of tendonitis and may help recovery. Your chiropractic doctor will know of an appropriate massage approach for your condition.
  • As part of a healthy, calcium-rich diet for healthy bones, make sure to eat fruit, fresh vegetables, seeds, and nuts. Aim to include salmon, tofu, sardines, and grains in your regular diet. In addition, including a cup of yogurt and another glass of low-fat or skim milk can add precious milligrams to your daily calcium intake.
  • Ice therapy. Ice therapy may help alleviate pain or reduce swelling.
  • Ultrasound treatment. The use of ultrasound may help break down scar tissue around the tendon, increasing circulation and softening the affected area. It may also help with the pain.

Contact Your Chiropractic Doctor

Doctors of chiropractic are licensed experts familiar with the diagnosis and treatment of tendonitis. With an adequate recovery approach, your tendons will improve or altogether recover from its present impairment. Studies show that chiropractic care is one of the most helpful therapeutic approaches for a variety of conditions. Your chiropractic doctor has many tools to help address your pain and discomfort.

The Dallas Chiropractor serves patients with Health Services and Dallas Therapy treatments.

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